Why Etiquette is Important in Hotel Business

Hotel business is not a cakewalk; the whole course is quite rough right from the start all the way. So if you do not have a strong stomach, you better not set your foot in the water. However, before starting a hotel business, there are some issues you have to consider. These comes beforehand, and help a lot in achieving success in the hotel business, not to mention  about the obvious customer satisfaction that you can get from proper planning.

Define Direction

Success in the hotel industry stems from having a long-term vision for the hotel, supported by clear business goals. Short term planning which is only concerned with next year’s budget cannot be the starting point.

Lead to Succeed

Little can be achieved on the journey to excellence without effective leadership. But leaders alone can’t make the result happen; they must set the example and inspire a motivated and thoroughly dedicated team.

Captivate Customers

The collective focus in truly excellent hotels must always be on building a great service experience; nothing matters more than satisfied customers. The reward for these efforts is that service quality is nearly impossible for competitors to copy, so it is a primary source of competitive advantage.

Sourced from: http://www.hospitalitynet.org/book/114001074.html

Guests are the main target for any hotel business, and their satisfaction is central to your business’ theme. This is why hotels need to be very careful how they handle their guests, as this determines whether or not the guests visit again and further affects the reputation of a hotel.

Housekeeping

Be respectful of the people who clean your room. Remember that they have a whole row of rooms that need to serviced, and you don’t want to slow them down. Never answer the door unless you are fully dressed. Don’t get into a personal discussion with the housekeeping staff. If possible, leave the room when the cleaning staff arrives. If you can’t, ask them to return later.

Common Areas and Facilities

Be as quiet as possible when walking down the hall to or from your room. If you need to talk with someone, use a soft voice. Remember that noise echoes in hallways and the sound may be amplified in the rooms. Try to refrain from talking in the hallway after 10:00 PM and before 8:00 AM.

Checkout

Many hotels have your checkout information on closed circuit TV that can only be seen inside your room as well as a printout that is quietly slipped under your door early on the morning you are scheduled to leave. Look over your bill to make sure all your charges are accurate. If everything is fine, you don’t have to do anything but leave your key in the room when it’s time to depart. If there is an issue, politely call the front desk and discuss the issue until it is resolved.

Sourced From: http://etiquette.about.com/od/TravelEtiquette/a/Hotel-Etiquette-For-Guests.htm

When you check into a hotel and you want to spend a night there, there are some things you should be ready for. Hence, it takes consideration to know how to make the new room an environment you can sleep comfortably in without feeling like you are in a new land away from home. Organizing yourself matters a lot here.

Ask for a blanket: Forget the big thick duvet that is made with the feathers of about 200 geese. That thing is an oven! The rooms are never cool enough. Get an old school blanket to throw on top of the sheet. Keep the duvet at your feet if you absolutely need it.

Spend the extra 14 bucks: I remember early on trying to save $7 here, $14 there on a cheaper motel. The truth is, by morning I wish I had anted up. I’ve had it all at the cheap motels: baby’s crying, dogs barking… loud lovers! Upgrade to the Hampton down the street and you’ll get thicker walls, a money back guarantee and all the perks (I just stayed at one for $79 last week).

Set three alarms: Never trust the wakeup call. They’re only about 90%. If you have an important meeting in the morning (or Disneyland opens at 8AM), then use the wakeup call, but also set a backup alarm, and one with a battery. (Do I sound a little OCD?)

Get a room on the top floor: Once when I was checking in at a hotel, I noticed about 40 teenage girls wearing jackets that said, “Marlene’s Dance Academy.” Yeah… they were practicing their routine in the room above me all night. Ask for the top floor whenever possible. You never have to worry about pounding above you.

Sourced From: http://www.jonathanmckeewrites.com/archive/2013/05/09/10-tips-hoteling.aspx